Blog Archives

What is High versus Extreme Performance?

While some applications in the data center require extreme performance, high performance is now a default requirement for all production applications. How performance is measured varies by application (for example, one application might require very high throughput while others might

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15 Minute Webinar: NVMe Readiness Assessment

Most All-Flash Arrays were bought in the last few years and have not come anywhere close to “end of life,” yet most vendors are now shipping NVMe All-Flash Arrays which offer better performance. As enticing as these new systems might

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What is Extreme Performance?

The modern data center has to support many different types of workloads, each of which makes different demands on the storage architecture. Today, standard all-flash arrays (AFA) are the mainstream storage system for the data centers and conventional best practice

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Why is Software Defined Storage Failing to Consolidate Storage?

After enterprises decide not to use the storage mainframe described in our last blog they often next investigate software-defined storage (SDS) as a means to consolidate their storage and reduce storage costs. With SDS, consolidation occurs at the storage software

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Is All-NVMe Worth Your Money? – WorkloadWisdom 6.2 Virtual Instruments Briefing Note

All-Flash Arrays (AFA), the goto high performance storage system for the past few years, is being replaced by All-NVMe. NVMe flash promises to improve performance by reducing latency and increasing bandwidth to flash based media. NVMe is PCIe based instead

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Is Your All-Flash Storage Software Block Only?

Accelerating database performance remains a top use case for all-flash arrays, so it makes sense that most all-flash array systems only support block storage. However, only supporting block means that the customer assigns the “raw” volume to a server and

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Does Your All-Flash Array Support Hard Disk Drives?

Technically, if an All-Flash Array (AFA) supports hard disk drives, it is no longer an AFA. What if however, the system could start as an AFA and then later, to save costs, move older data to inexpensive, high capacity hard

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Does Your All-Flash Software Provide Data Protection?

Most primary storage systems and software provide some form of data protection. That protection comes in the form of protection from media failure (typically RAID), snapshots and clones. All-Flash Arrays (AFA) seem to provide a better than average level of

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SlideShare: How to Design a 92TB, 500K IOPS AFA for less than $95,000!

All-Flash Arrays are the model of inefficiency and as flash media increases in density and performance, the cost of this inefficiency becomes more obvious. Enterprise solid-state drives (SSD) deliver 70,000 IOPS per drive but most AFAs need 24 drives or

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Is All-Flash Deduplication a Must Have?

In the early days of All-Flash Arrays (AFA) deduplication was a key catalyst for adoption. Server and Desktop virtualization environments benefited greatly from the technology because of the similarity between virtual machine images. The environments also didn’t have the same

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