Paper: How to Reduce the Cost of Hyperconverged Infrastructure

Hyperconverged Infrastructures (HCI) promise affordability and simplicity because they are created with commodity servers which are clustered together. These servers are called nodes and the infrastructure expands by adding additional nodes to the cluster. Additional nodes though, mean making space in the data center for the new node, connecting the node to the network and integrating it with the cluster. It may also mean redistributing data from other nodes in the cluster to the new node. As the node count increases, complexity and price increase right along with it. Ironically, early success with HCI often leads to unexpected expenses.

In our latest Storage Switzerland white paper, “How to Reduce the Cost of Hyperconverged Infrastructure” examines the challenges facing organizations as they attempt to leverage the early success of their HCI environment and scale it to support more workloads. To get your copy register for our on demand webinar “How to Put an End to Hyperconverged Silos” and the white paper will be available as an attachment as soon as it starts playing.

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Twelve years ago George Crump founded Storage Switzerland with one simple goal; to educate IT professionals about all aspects of data center storage. He is the primary contributor to Storage Switzerland and is a heavily sought after public speaker. With over 25 years of experience designing storage solutions for data centers across the US, he has seen the birth of such technologies as RAID, NAS and SAN, Virtualization, Cloud and Enterprise Flash. Prior to founding Storage Switzerland he was CTO at one of the nation's largest storage integrators where he was in charge of technology testing, integration and product selection.

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